HRLR
Los Tocayos Carlos
Chapter 16
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Figure 39: The execution "table."

In their last seconds together, Carlos told Pickett, "I just want to thank you, daddy, for being my daddy for one day."233 He asked Pickett again to hold his leg when it started, and Pickett put his hand on Carlos's knee.234

Just then, the witnesses took their places. None of Carlos's people were there, nor anyone from Wanda Lopez's family, though they'd been invited.235 The known witnesses, besides Reverend Pickett and the prison officials and guards, were Michael Graczyk, an Associated Press reporter, and Jim Mattox, the elected Attorney General of Texas.236 Mattox would occasionally slip over from the capital in Austin to watch an execution. Mattox came, Pickett noticed, when he felt a need for a last-minute confession or new details on a crime.237

"Carlos looked over at [the witnesses]," Pickett recalled, "and then he looked back. He kept his eyes on me, and he said he was going to [keep his eyes there]. He said, 'Will you be where I can see you?' I said, 'Yes, I'll stand right here. I won't move.'"238

The warden asked Carlos if he had any last words. Carlos gave his final statement. With that, everything was ready.239 Pickett kept his hand on Carlos's knee.240

* * * * *

According to Pickett, Carlos's last words were not accurately recorded in the press or in the prison record—they almost never were, he said.241 By all accounts, Carlos did not confess to the crime and offered no pleas for forgiveness or understanding.242

Carlos's first concern was his family. The press accounts confirmed this and so did Reverend Pickett.243 Although she wasn't there, Rose DeLuna confirmed it as well. Several days after the execution, Rose received a letter from Carlos that Pickett had mailed later that morning.244 Although the letter, along with all of Carlos's last possessions, was lost in a flood in Garland, Texas, Rose would never forget Carlos's final gesture to her.245 "He knew that I would be hurting for him," Rose recalled, and he said "he was so sorry for all the pain he had caused" over the years "to his family members and to . . . our mother."246

Carlos's other concern was the friends he was leaving behind on death row.247 To them, his last words—which Pickett knew were "very, very important" to him—were "Don't give up." That was Carlos's message, Pickett said, to others "striving to prove their innocence."248

* * * * *

Carlos's time was up.

After he said his final words, Pickett recalled, "he looked up at me, and he had these big old brown eyes. I'll never forget those brown eyes. I can dream about those brown eyes."249 Pickett motioned to the warden that it was time.250

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:33:07:

And he said, "I just want to thank you, daddy, for being my daddy for one day." I couldn't cry. I never have been able to, and I wasn't supposed to, first of all. He said, "Would you please keep your hand on my leg?" So it [sic] put it right on his knee. One of the things I did, I put my thumb where I could feel his pulse. On everybody that asked for it. After a while they all started asking for it. But the warden came back in and he, Carlos DeLuna, whispered to me, "I just want to thank you for being so good to me, daddy." And the warden looked up at me and just smiled. The warden's a tough man, cowboy boots, all that kind of stuff. But he never interfered with that last 45 seconds. Then the witnesses came in, stood back here. Carlos looked over at them, and then he looked back. He kept his eyes on me, and he said he was going to. He said, "Will you be where I can see you?" I said, "Yes, I'll stand right here. I won't move." And Mr. Lynaugh, who was the director [of the overall Department of Corrections], stepped through the door and said, "Warden, you may proceed," which is procedure. The warden said, "Thank you, sir." The warden said, "Carlos, do you have any final words?" And Carlos gave his statement. I have his accurate statement. . . . . The book [put out by the Texas Department of Corrections] doesn't have his accurate statement. But it was very sweet, if you want to use that term. It was very sincere.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:33:07.

James S. Liebman's Notes on Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain (July 11, 2004) at 1 ("[Carlos's family] [d]idn't see execution").

For the reaction of Wanda Lopez's family to DeLuna's execution, see Transcribed Videotape Interview with Richard Louis Vargas, Brother of Wanda Lopez, in Corpus Christi, Texas (Dec. 4, 2004) at 07:11:30–7:11:50 ("Q. At that time, the night of your sister's death until Dec 7, 1989 when Carlos DeLuna was executed, what were your feelings towards him? A. I didn't know the individual, only what I come to hear. I couldn't believe that he did it, for what reason. If he only knew my sister he wouldn't of done this.");

Associated Press, Texan Is Put to Death by Injection for Killing Woman in a Robbery, N.Y. Times, Dec. 8, 1989, at A24, available at http://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/08/us/texan-is-put-to-death-by-injection-for-killing-woman-in-a-robbery.html ("When told about the execution, Ms. Lopez's mother, Mary Vargas, said, 'I'm glad this is over with.'"); Cindy Tumiel, Convicted Killer Executed After Court Rejects Appeals, Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Dec. 7, 1989, at B1 ("DeLuna has continued to maintain his innocence, claiming that the murder was committed by a friend named Carlos Hernandez. But those whose lives were touched by the crime doubt the story. 'He'll be lying until he dies,' said Mary Vargas, Lopez'[s] mother. 'He'll lie like he's been lying. Now he has to pay for what he did to my daughter.'").

See generally Carlton Stowers, Final Passages: The Reverend Carroll Pickett Leaves a Grim 15-Year Legacy of Very Personal Ministry, Hous. Press, Nov. 2, 2000, available at http://www.houstonpress.com/content/printVersion/223725/:

One of the traditions attached to the administration of the death sentence that troubled him most, Pickett says, was that of the family members' being allowed to witness the execution. "I've always felt it would be easier on everyone if they could find it in themselves not to be there and watch."

"I would meet with them beforehand and do the best I could to explain what they would see, but it rarely prepared them. There is a great difference in watching an elderly loved one die of cancer and seeing a healthy man who, for lack of a better term, is not of dying age, being put to death. Seeing someone you care for strapped down, scared, totally helpless, knowing he is about to be killed, is a traumatic experience beyond almost any other I can imagine."

From his vantage point in the death chamber, Pickett saw witnesses faint, and he watched as others became hysterical and violently ill. "I don't like to think of the number of times I've been told by a family member afterward that I hadn't prepared them for what they actually experienced," he says. "The truth of the matter is, no matter how hard you try, there is just no way to do it."

In keeping with his duties, however, Pickett never voiced his personal feelings on the matter, never discouraged any visit by those who wished to be on hand in the final moments.

Holdings of the Texas State Archives, Execution Witness List, Carlos DeLuna #744 (Dec. 7, 1989) (listing "The Honorable Jim Mattox, Attorney General, State of Texas" as one of the witnesses to the execution);

Michael Graczyk, Associated Press, Texas Inmate Executed for 1983 Robbery-Slaying, Dec. 7, 1989;

see Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:45:11–22:53:24:

Jim Mattox, the Attorney General of Texas, started attending the executions. I don't know exactly when, it might have been right at the very beginning. The very first ones were high profile—Cowboy Autry [James David Autry, executed in 1984], Charlie Brooks [executed in 1982], Candyman [Ronald Clark O'Brien, executed in 1984], these people were high profile. . . . But Jim Mattox would come and . . . sometimes he'd want to come in and talk to the inmate at a quarter to eleven. And he would ask questions, which I felt like were totally out of place,8 totally out of place. . . . Sometimes he and I would talk. He told me several times, "I am not in favor of this killing. I am not in favor of this." In particular when he had one that wasn't a high-profile case. Sometimes he would come in the witness room and watch the tie-down and watch the insertion. . . . Sometimes Jim Mattox would stay in the visitors room, the witness room . . . Jim Mattox said, [a]fter [Carlos DeLuna] was strapped down, and the warden left . . . And he whispered to me, "Come here." . . . "How long do you think we have to keep doing this horrible thing?" I didn't say a word.

James S. Liebman's Notes on Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain (July 11, 2004) at 2–3 ("Jim Maddox [sic—Mattox] came over to [DeLuna's] execution. . . . P[ickett] has [a] note on paper that Maddox was around for this [DeLuna's] one [execution]. . . . We'd take them in and strap them in; and Maddox would come into visitor's room and stay there. . . . Maddox: This one: 'Never should have been here.' . . . 'Why do we have to do this.' . . . "; "Maddox: 'This guy should never have been here.'").

Carlton Stowers, Final Passages: The Reverend Carroll Pickett Leaves a Grim 15-Year Legacy of Very Personal Ministry, Hous. Press, Nov. 2, 2000, http://www.houstonpress.com/2000-11-02/news/final-passages/:

While [Pickett's] focus in those final hours was to keep the inmate as calm as possible, often those in law enforcement would demand one final chance at obtaining a confession or details of the crime for which the prisoner had been convicted. One sheriff even suggested that Pickett disregard the confidentiality vow he'd taken as a minister and wear a wire so that any admission to other crimes of which a particular inmate was suspected might be recorded. Ultimately Pickett went to the warden with a request that then-Texas attorney general Jim Maddox [sic—Mattox] be kept away from the death house on execution day. "He always wanted to talk with the prisoner, asking for details of the crime," Pickett recalls. Maddox, he says, only made a bad situation worse with his demanding demeanor and monopoly of the condemned man's final hours.

Susan Montez's Notes on Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain (July 17, 2004) at 7 ("Reverend Pickett was asked twice to wear a wire while spending time with a condemned prisoner, in case the prisoner should confess to the instant or other crimes. He refused. Attorney General Maddox [sic—Mattox] was especially pushy about getting last-minute confessions or details of crimes, so much so that Reverend Pickett requested that the warden not allow Maddox into the prison during an execution.").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:33:07–22:35:15;

see Kathy Fair, Murderer DeLuna Is Put to Death, Hous. Chron., Dec. 7, 1989 at 33A (noting that DeLuna repeatedly lifted his head from the gurney to look at Pickett).

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:33:07–22:35:15.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:33:07–22:35:15;

see Kathy Fair, Murderer DeLuna is Put to Death, Hous. Chron., Dec. 7, 1989 at 33A. ("DeLuna, Pickett said, was scared and had asked the minister to maintain physical contact with him while he died. So Pickett stood there, with his right hand lightly resting on the condemned man's lower right leg as the lethal injection was administered.").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:17:05–22:19:01:

Even Carlos's final words are not accurate in that book [published by the Texas Department of Corrections about final meals and statements]. In fact, they're not accurate in any book, or in a magazine. I would tell the convicts and the inmates, "The only way they're going to quote exactly what you say is if you say nothing." And this is true of many people. What Carlos said—I'm five inches from his leg. I would hear what he said, I would—We practiced, ok? He and I practiced at 11:30 what he wanted to say. So I knew what he wanted to say. Some of them wanted me to help them do it, and I couldn't do it. I was not allowed to. But I know that there was a person writing down, exactly, his words. . . . But the ones in this book, and the ones that were on TV [were not accurate]. And I'm not knocking reporters. The media just doesn't—They're down there in shock. Ted Koppel is considered one of the greatest people in the world in the media. And he watched an execution. He came to watch the execution of Mario Marquez, who was mentally retarded, who was very much, in my mind, like Carlos. Very much like him. And I was interviewed by Ted Koppel. And I told him, "If you witness this, you're not going to hear or report exactly what he says." He said, "What do you mean?" I said, "Because your emotions are going to be involved." And he went on his TV program and quoted what [Mario Marquez] said, and it was totally wrong. I met with him the next day and I told him. I said, "This is what Mario said." The same way with Carlos [DeLuna's last words].

See supra notes 151–52 and accompanying text. For press accounts of DeLuna's final words, see infra notes 243, 247, 265. For the official Texas Department of Criminal Justice version of DeLuna's final statement, see Texas Dep't of Criminal Justice, Offender Information Last Statement for Carlos DeLuna (Dec. 7, 1989), http://www.tdcj.state.tx.us/death_row/dr_info/delunacarloslast.html.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:17:05–22:21:08.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:19:01–22:22:08:

But Carlos and I practiced what he was going to say. If you notice the real words, Carlos never admitted to the crime. He did not apologize or ask forgiveness from the family of who was killed. His concern was for his family. He was concerned for the friends he had on Death Row. One of his last words, which are very, very important, "Don't give up." Because many of them are striving to prove their innocence. 120, I believe it is, in America, have been taken off Death Row in the last three years or four years, who were found to be innocent. I believe Carlos was one of those.

See Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:35:15–22:39:30 ("He loved his family very much.");

Associated Press, Texan Is Put to Death by Injection for Killing Woman in a Robbery, N.Y. Times, Dec. 8, 1989, at A24, available at http://www.nytimes.com/1989/12/08/us/texan-is-put-to-death-by-injection-for-killing-woman-in-a-robbery.html ("'I want to say I hold no grudges,' Mr. DeLuna said while strapped to a gurney in the death chamber. 'I hate nobody. I want my family to know I love them. I want to tell everyone on death row to keep the faith up, to keep going. Everything will be all right.'"); Michael Graczyk, Associated Press, Texas Inmate Executed for 1983 Robbery-Slaying, Dec. 7, 1989 ("DeLuna, 27, said . . . 'I want my family to know I love them.");

Anne Michaud, Inmate Executed at Walls, The Huntsville Item, Dec. 7, 1989, at 1 ("Carlos DeLuna used his last minutes of life to tell his family he loved them.").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:50:40–21:54:40:

A. I didn't tell many people that this took place. Because, first of all, so much gets out of there that I don't know how it gets out. It's like that one letter. Nobody ever knew, when people wrote letters, who I mailed them to. Because the warden never looked at them, nobody ever looked at them. I took them and mailed them at four o'clock in the morning when nobody was at the Post Office. But somehow the prosecutor in Nueces County found out about that. How he did, I will never—I don't know to this day. And it bothered me. But that was because he trusted me and I trusted him. I never understand about how that happened. I never have revealed where that letter went, and I will not. I promised Carlos and I will keep that promise.

Q. There was an article written in the Houston Chronicle by a reporter by the name of Kathy Fair. And an implication left by that letter [sic—article] was that Carlos DeLuna had written a letter to the family of the victims to ask their forgiveness. I know you have a relationship with Carlos, a minister-penitent relationship, which prevents you from revealing. But is it accurate to say that he wrote a letter to say that he wrote a letter to the family of the victim.

A. No. . . . I think, in that article, Kathy says, and I told her—She was the one who informed me that the Nueces County prosecutor found out about it. And she asked me about that. And I think that article states that I stated it was not [written or addressed] to anyone involved in this crime for which he was executed. I'm pretty sure that's in that article. To this day, I will maintain, it was not. It was not to anyone involved with this case. But I will not say who it went to.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Rose Rhoton, Sister of Carlos DeLuna, in Houston, Tex. (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:21:30–21:26:27:

Q. There was a letter that was written. Carlos wrote a letter at the very, very end of his hours, he wrote a letter . . . . Would you tell us about that letter—what the contents were and what became of the letter?

A. I wish I would have been able to save that letter. When I opened that letter, Carlos was apologizing for all the hurt that he caused. And I know what he meant by that. He was hurting for us, because he knew that I would be hurting for him. He knew that. And he was just so sorry for all the pain that he caused to his family members, and to his mom, to our mother. He knew that.

Q. Did he say anything in that letter that indicated he was guilty of the crime for which he was—

A. No. He never stated that on the letter. He just said he was sorry for causing us pain. He was sorry.

Q. What happened to that letter?

A. When we moved, I had asked my sister, that lives in Garland. I had some boxes, all Carlos's stuff, that was sent back to me. And that was the hardest thing, receiving your brother's things. They sent them in boxes. All his belongings in a box. I placed all those things in a storage box, because I was very hurt. When we moved I asked my sister if we could store some stuff in her garage and she said yes.

A. When I did ask for all the stuff back, which was six, seven years later, all the stuff got destroyed. Which I was very devastated, because Carlos's things were there. All his belongings, his watch that he wore all the time, his books that he read, his Bible, were all destroyed. And all the letters that we corresponded back and forth was all destroyed in that box.

Q. Do you know how it got destroyed?

A. My sister said it was damage by all the rain, things that her storage got all messed up. Not only did my things get destroyed but her things got destroyed, too.

Q. Let me just ask, if someone were to say, here's this newspaper article, and it says that he wrote a letter asking for forgiveness at the end of his life, and that proves that he must have admitted his guilt of this crime in that letter, what would you say to that?

A. Carlos was asking for forgiveness from us, for us to forgive him for all the agony that he put us through, for the pain. He knew that we were going through pain. He's told me many times, "I'm so sorry that this is happening, I'm so sorry that you're going through all this." And he asked for me to forgive him, but what's there to forgive? Your family members, your brother, your sister makes a mistake? Carlos never hurt me, he never did anything to me. Did he get in trouble? Yes. Did it hurt to see him get executed? Yes. But he's my brother and I love him. His forgiveness came from God. I believe that God forgave him, and Carlos is in the best place now. He's peaceful. He's at peace.

See James S. Liebman, Notes on Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain (July 11, 2004) at 2 ("Kathy Fair—Houston Chronicle. Now Kathy Walt; husband [is a lawyer] in [Texas] AG's [Attorney General's] office. She's PP [press person] for Gov. [Perry.] She wrote article saying CDL [Carlos DeLuna] wrote letter asking for forgiveness on night before execution. She came to P[ickett] to ask who letter was sent to. He wouldn't tell her, but he did tell her and article says that it was NOT [written to] anyone involved in the crime in any way. Not [written to a] member of V's [victim's] family. Believes it was [written to] a member of his [DeLuna's] family to whom he wrote.");

Susan Montez's Notes on Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain (July 17, 2004) at 3 ("I asked Reverend Pickett about a letter Carlos had sent out shortly before his death. Reverend Pickett said he regularly mailed out letters for prisoners about to be executed. The warden knew about it and did not object. Reverend Pickett mailed a letter out for Carlos, but he could not reveal the contents of the letter because of the priest-penitent relationship he had with Carlos. Reverend Pickett stated that he could tell me it was not a confession to murder.");

see also Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:54:47–21:55:52 ("My method of ministry, if he would have given me a letter at ten minutes to midnight, I put them inside this pocket. (mimes putting a letter in his inside jacket pocket) The warden knew I was doing this. I did this for almost all ninety-five. But he never asked me who it went to. The system requires they are supposed to be censored, but once a person is dead they don't have to censor. So I wasn't breaking any laws.").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Rose Rhoton, Sister of Carlos DeLuna, in Houston, Tex. (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:21:30–21:26:27 (quoted supra note 244).

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Rose Rhoton, Sister of Carlos DeLuna, in Houston, Tex. (Feb. 26, 2005).

In a second instance of potentially misleading news coverage attributable to Houston Chronicle reporter, Kathy Fair, see supra Chapter 15, notes 345–348 and accompanying text, she wrote in the opening paragraph of her last story on Carlos DeLuna for the Chronicle that "[o]ne of Carlos DeLuna's last acts before being executed was to ask a prison chaplain to mail a letter to one of his victims seeking forgiveness." Kathy Fair, Executed Murderer Asked Forgiveness, Chaplain Says, Hous. Chron, Dec. 8, 1989, at 32A.

As Fair disclosed later in the article, she had no basis for using the word "victim" in a context that suggested she was talking about a crime victim. Her source for the information in the story was Rev. Pickett. And "Pickett" told her, as she acknowledged near the end of the article, "that DeLuna had asked him to mail a letter to someone the convict believed had not forgiven him. It was not sent to Lopez's parents, Pickett said. He declined to specify to whom the letter was addressed, other than to say it was not sent to anyone involved in the case for which he was executed." Kathy Fair, Executed Murderer Asked Forgiveness, Chaplain Says, Hous. Chron, Dec. 8, 1989, at 32A (emphasis added).

As is set out above, see supra note 244, although Pickett's duty of confidentiality to a penitent prevents him from disclosing the addressee of the letter, see Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:50:40–21:54:40, he has confirmed that the letter was not mailed to anyone with any relationship to Wanda Lopez, see Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:50:40–21:54:40, other sources cited supra note 244, and Carlos DeLuna's sister Rose Rhoton has revealed that the letter was written to her seeking forgiveness from her and the rest of his family for all the anguish he put them through over the course of his life. See Transcribed Videotape Interview with Rose Rhoton, Sister of Carlos DeLuna, in Houston, Tex. (Feb. 26, 2005) at 21:21:30–21:26:27.

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:19:01–22:22:08:

But Carlos and I practiced what he was going to say. If you notice the real words, Carlos never admitted to the crime. He did not apologize or ask forgiveness from the family of who was killed. His concern was for his family. He was concerned for the friends he had on Death Row. One of his last words, which are very, very important, "Don't give up." Because many of them are striving to prove their innocence. 120, I believe it is, in America, have been taken off Death Row in the last three years or four years, who were found to be innocent. I believe Carlos was one of those.

See Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:35:15–22:39:30 ("And then he told these guys out on Death Row to hang in there.");

DeLuna Executed for the 1983 Robbery-Slaying of Woman, Galveston Daily News, Dec. 8, 1989, at A11 ("Convicted killer Carlos DeLuna, saying he had no hate and professing support for his fellow death row inmates, was executed early Thursday for the 1983 Robbery-Slaying of a Corpus Christi Woman. . . . DeLuna had insisted all along that he was not responsible for the death of Wanda Jean Lopez, 24"); Michael Graczyk, Associated Press, Texas Inmate Executed for 1983 Robbery-Slaying, Dec. 7, 1989 ("Convicted killer Carlos DeLuna, saying he had no hate and professing support for his fellow death row inmates, was executed early Thursday for the 1983 Robbery-Slaying of a Corpus Christi Woman.");

Cindy Tumiel, Convicted Killer Executed After Court Rejects Appeals, Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Dec. 7, 1989, at B1 ("DeLuna gave a short statement to those present, '. . . I want to tell everyone on death row to keep the faith up—to keep going. Everything will be all right'").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain, in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:19:01–22:22:08; see Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:35:15–22:39:30 ("And then he told these guys out on Death Row to hang in there.").

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:35:15–22:39:30 ("And then he told these guys out on Death Row to hang in there. And then he looked up at me, and he had these big old brown eyes. I'll never forget those brown eyes. I can dream about those brown eyes. So, since I had not told the warden what his last words were going to be, I nodded to the warden that that was it.");

see Kathy Fair, Murderer DeLuna Is Put to Death, Hous. Chron., Dec. 7, 1989 at 33A (noting that DeLuna repeatedly lifted his head from the gurney to look at Pickett).

Transcribed Videotape Interview with Carroll Pickett, Texas Death House Chaplain in Huntsville, Texas (Feb. 26, 2005) at 22:35:15–22:39:30.

Chapter 16
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